The Nordic Nomad

Stockholm, Sweden

48 hours in Stockholm, Sweden

Where to stay, eat, shop and play in Stockholm

Want to make the most of your weekend in Stockholm? With stylish hotels, cosy cafés, hot restaurants and cool retail aplenty, it certainly isn’t easy to narrow down the list of must-visits. Explore our curated 48 hour city guide for where to stay, eat, shop and play in Stockholm.

Day 01

15.00

It’s check-in time

You have arrived. To make the most out of your stay, the proven expression ‘location, location, location’ rings true when selecting a Stockholm hotel – your base for the upcoming days. Centrally located, Scandi-cool Nobis Hotel ticks all the boxes. Located in the Norrmalm neighbourhood, the spot offers easy access to all of the city’s neighbourhoods, and has tons of restaurants, bars, shops and other attractions in the vicinity.

Other stylish accommodations with great locations are Ett Hem, At Six, Bank Hotel, Villa Dagmar and Hotel Frantz.

Nobis Hotel
Norrmalmstorg 2-4
Stockholm
Sweden

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Photography courtesy of Nobis Stockholm

Tjoget Stockholm Sweden bar restaurant
Tjoget Stockholm Sweden bar restaurant

17.00

Time for a tipple

Multi-space venue Tjoget has been featured on the annual list of The World’s 50 Best Bars various times. The venue, a cocktail bar, eatery, wine bar and beer café in one, was founded by bartenders Andreas Bergman and Joel Söderbäck in the former working-class area of Hornstull. It lies a little off the beaten path but is well worth the visit. Tjoget’s signature is Beets by Tjoget, a cocktail that mixes beetroot and vodka with coconut and ginger.

Other Stockholm cocktail bars to try are Lucy’s Flower Shop, Röda Huset, A Bar Called Gemma, Coquetel Social, Le Hibou and Pharmarium.

Tjoget
Hornsbruksgatan 24
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Tjoget

19.00

A celebration of local produce

At Agrikultur, a quaint and relaxed one Michelin star restaurant, Filip Fastén, Swedish Chef of the Year in 2014, has teamed up with chef Joel Åhlin to create an unmissable gastronomic experience. At the easy price of 825 Swedish krona, the pair serves up a fine-tuned and mouth-watering feast that celebrates the freshest, finest and most sustainably produced ingredients from selected local farms, ranches and dairies. At sister restaurant Bar Agrikultur, the ethos remains the same while the crowd is hipper and more boisterous.

For other like-minded dining experiences, try Petri, Portal, Restaurang Oxenstiernan and Gastrologik.

Agrikultur
Roslagsgatan 43
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Agrikultur

Day 02

9.00

Breakfast for aesthetic champions

In a bid to apply the same care and attention to detail to the menu of a café as at a fine restaurant, Anna and Rasmus Axelsson left their jobs at some of the city’s finest establishments to pursue their dream of running their own place. Pom & Flora, a café that serves breakfast and light lunches all day every day, was born. The menu features some expected items such as acai bowls and avocado toasts, but we suggest getting the steel-cut oat porridge with lingonberries, ginger, granola and almond butter – you’ll need the energy with your busy day ahead.

There’s a second Pom & Flora in the Södermalm neighbourhood.

Pom & Flora
Odengatan 39
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Natur & Kultur and Emma Olbers

10.00

Shop ’til you drop

What started out as no more than 100 pairs of raw denim jeans with red stitching to give to friends and family has, in a couple of decades, turned into a global fashion phenomenon that has the sales to back up the hype. In 2020, co-founder Jonny Johansson, who until this day still oversees the brand’s creative direction, tasked Barcelona studio Arquitectura-G to refresh the Norrmalmstorg flagship store. The result is a monumental retail temple featuring a striking monochrome palette of real and faux marble.

For other quintessential Swedish retail experiences, head to classic interior design brand Svenskt Tenn, fashion brand Tôteme, jewellery store All Blues, sustainable and transparent fashion brand Asket and perfume house Byredo.

Acne Studio​
Norrmalmstorg 2
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Acne Studio

12.00

Enjoy some pickled herring

The perfect day in Stockholm includes an unmissable lunch at Oaxen Slip, a bustling bistro located in a former slipway. The eatery, which is decked out with industrial vintage furniture and nautical memorabilia, serves hearty Nordic bistro fare that is high in taste and quality. If it’s on the menu at your visit, make sure to try the Norrøna herring with crispbread, egg cream and pickled silver onion and the steak tartare.

Owners Magnus Ek and Agneta Green also run Oaxen Krog, with two Michelin stars, at the same address.

Oaxen Slip​
Beckholmsvägen 26
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Oaxen and Erik Olsson

13.00

Take a stroll around Royal Djurgården

Royal Djurgården, an island that is part of the Royal National City Park, is a tranquil and green oasis in the middle of Stockholm. The island has been in possession of the crown since the 15th century and was the place where Swedish songwriter Carl Michael Bellman would spend many a night carousing in the 18th century. Also called ‘the museum island’ (the Vasa, Nordic, Skansen and ABBA museums are all found there), we love exploring the island on foot.

We highly recommend a visit to Prins Eugens Waldemarsudde, the former residence of Prince Eugen that has been transformed into a lovely art museum, and the Rosendal gardens, which has its own artisanal bakery and farm shop.

Djurgården​
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Visit Stockholm

15.00

Get your caffeine and gluten fixes

In Sweden, three o’clock is ‘fika’ time – a short coffee and cake break that is important in Swedish culture. At Lillebrors Bageri, a tiny bakery with a huge following, the queues for baked goods stretch far down the street. Fret not – the freshly baked pastries to come out of the ovens at Lillebrors are well worth the wait. The traditional ‘semlor’ sweet rolls and ‘krämbulle’ cream and custard-filled buns are a treat, but the pastry we keep returning for is the ‘tosca’ sticky bun.

Other great cafés and coffee shops in Stockholm are Café Pascal, Saturnus, Drop Coffee and Gast.

Lillebrors Bageri​
Rörstrandsgatan 12
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Lillebrors Bageri

16.00

Get into the zen zone

For some R&R before the evening’s activities, head to Grand Hôtel’s Nordic Spa & Fitness. The spa has a number of treatments inspired by the region: the Nordic Deluxe Bathing Ritual full-day package includes warm and cool dipping pools, saunas, a body scrub and beauty treatment, while the 90-minute Nordic Beauty treatment gives you a full-body boost using organic Scandinavian cranberry.

Other spa alternatives in and near Stockholm are Sturebadet, Yasuragi and Ellery Beach House.

Nordic Spa & Fitness​
Grand Hôtel
Södra Blasieholmshamnen 4B
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Grand Hôtel

17.00

Cocktail hour

Once you’ve stepped out of your robe at Nordic Spa & Fitness, head to Grand Hôtel’s Cadierbaren, where the cocktails are made to perfection. The elegant bar, named after French chef Régis Cadier, the founder of the hotel, was remodelled in 2006. Head bartender Hanna Oscarsson has crafted a menu of signature cocktails. Among them is ‘Kallsup’, which translates to an involuntary gulp of water, an intriguing and slightly more fragrant version of the Dry Martini.

Other hotel bars that are Stockholm must-visits are Guldbaren at Nobis Hotel, Watson’s Bar at Hotel Rival, T/Bar at Hotel Diplomat, Le Hibou at Bank Hotel and Blanch & Hierta at At Six.

Cadierbaren
Grand Hôtel
Södra Blasieholmshamnen 4B
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Grand Hôtel

Frantzén Stockholm Sweden restaurant

19.00

A house of gastronomic discoveries

Frantzén delivers a truly immersive dining experience that involves all three floors of a Stockholm townhouse, a team of chefs that is at least twice the size of a soccer team and some of Scandinavia’s and the world’s most extravagant and hard-to-find ingredients. Ring the doorbell to be greeted by your name, step into the elevator and let this once in a lifetime gastronomic adventure begin. And prepare your checking account for some serious damage. Chef Björn Frantzén’s food is a unique hybrid of Nordic cuisine with Asian notes – among the signatures is his take on French toast, butter-fried levain bread with aged parmesan, fried onions and 100-year-old balsamic vinegar topped with an insane amount of black truffle.

Although Frantzén is Stockholm’s only three Michelin star restaurant, two-star restaurants Gastrologik, Aloë, and Oaxen Krog also come highly recommended.

Frantzén​
Klara Norra kyrkogata 26
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Frantzén and Erik Lefvander

 

Day 03

9.00

A greasy breakfast

A late food-centric night needs to be followed by a hefty breakfast and no one does that better than Greasy Spoon. Founded by British expats Laura Hinton and Tyrone Poh-Janrel, this eatery with walk-in seating is a modern take on a classic British institution. The menu is made up of breakfast staples such as hot muffins, eggs Benedict and smoked salmon on potato rosti.

There are two other Greasy Spoon restaurants in the Södermalm neighbourhood.

Greasy Spoon​
Hagagatan 4
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Greasy Spoon

 

10.00

Get a bit of culture

At a dozen or so state-owned Stockholm museums, visitors can enjoy art, architecture, history, and culture free of charge. Among them is the spectacular Nationalmuseum, which was reinaugurated in 2018 after a long building restoration. Nationalmuseum is Sweden’s museum of fine art and design, and the collections include paintings, sculptures, drawings and graphic art from the 16th century up to the beginning of the 20th century and the collection of applied art and design up to the present day.

We also love exploring Moderna Muséet for contemporary art, Fotografiska for photographic art, Hallwylska Muséet for the private collection of Wilhelmina von Hallwyl and her husband Walther, and Sven-Harrys konstmuseum for its striking architecture.

Nationalmuseum​
Södra Blasieholmshamnen 2
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Nationalmuseum and Bruno Ehrs

12.00

The last meal

End your Stockholm visit on a high note with lunch at Bar Central where the advent of a fresh and unpasteurised tank of Pilsner Urquell, arriving directly from the Czech Republic brewery, regularly gathers lager lovers. The tank bar – restaurateur Robert Rudinski’s second Stockholm restaurant – centres around two horizontal 500-litre stainless steel tanks that, with the addition of a countertop, doubles as a bar. The menu features Central European specialities such as spätzle, Wienerschnitzel and lángos. Architect Fredrik Stenberg and artist Jonas Nobel of local design office Uglycute have designed the space.

Bar Central’s second restaurant is located in the Södermalm neighbourhood.

Bar Central​
Birger Jarlsgatan 41
Stockholm
Sweden

Photography courtesy of Bar Central

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